Everyday Mathematics The University of Chicago School Mathematics Project
About Everyday Mathematics

About the Everyday Mathematics Author Group

The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Chicago is home to the authors of Everyday Mathematics.

The development of Everyday Mathematics involves mathematicians, mathematics educators, classroom teachers, and experienced mathematics textbook writers and editors. Short bios are available for most of the authors, advisors, and technical staff.

Click on a grade level to see authors:

Pre-K

Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Pre-K

Authors
Deborah Arron Leslie, Ann E. Audrain, Jean Bell, Max Bell, Jeanine O'Nan Brownell
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Patrick Carroll, Tiffany Nicole Slade
Consultant
Arthur J. Baroody
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Tracy Aiden, Jane Averill, Barbara Bryan, Pat Chamberlain, Barbara Clear, Pam Dayhoff, Amanda DiMattina, Christina Duffy, Shelia Forde, Dorothy Freedman, Anja Gadbois, Maria Gallagher, Carmen Garay, Gabriella Gavino, Jeff Gillespie, Ana Gonzalez, Ethel Gue, Megan Hillegass, Barbara Jeffries, Ophe Jones, Julie Jurgens, Margaret Krulee, Vicki Laskaris, Lesley May, Colleen McAllister, Barbara McMurray, Kathy McQueen, Jackie Morgan, Donna Oline, Jenny Hennig Parent, Diane Patterson, Elizabeth Regan, Esperanza Rivas, Irma Rodriguez, Alison Schwartz, Sheila Sconiers, Earnice Sheppard, Chad Taylor, Mary Kate Toner, Linda Van Ausdall, Maria Viteri, Julie Vogel, Mary Watt, Derek Young, Karyl Zahorik
  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

  • Jean Bell

    Jean Bell is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and the Center Agreement that established the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago.

    Early in her career Jean Bell was a microbiologist in the California State Public Health Laboratories and in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Beem at the University of Chicago. In a career change after some years of full-time parenting Bell began teaching pre-school children and then with an MST degree from the University of Chicago became a primary school teacher.

    In the early 1980's Bell did interview-based research on the mathematics capabilities of young children that showed very clearly that these capabilities had been seriously underestimated. This led her to work with other founding authors within the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) on development of the grades K-6 Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    On completion of the First Edition of Everyday Mathematics she returned to her science roots, founding with others the Chicago Science Group to develop the K-5 Science Companion curriculum. That curriculum, distributed by Pearson Scott Foresman, seeks to be inquiry based, relatively easy to implement, firmly rooted in "reform" oriented national standards, and easily integrated with such programs as Everyday Mathematics.

  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics, and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

Kindergarten

Authors
Jean Bell, Max Bell, David W. Beer* , Dorothy Freedman, Nancy Guile Goodsell, Nancy Hanvey, Deborah Arron Leslie, Kate Morrison
First Edition only
* Third Edition only
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Ann E. Audrain, Margaret Krulee, Barbara Smart
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Patrick Carroll, Lila K. Schwartz, Tiffany Nicole Slade
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Deborah Adams, Patrick Carroll, Moira Erwine, Carolyn Frieswyk, Serena Hohmann, Amy Rose, John Saller, Sheila Sconiers, Ann Smelser, Penny Stahly, Izaak Wirszup, Nancy Roesing
  • Jean Bell

    Jean Bell is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and the Center Agreement that established the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago.

    Early in her career Jean Bell was a microbiologist in the California State Public Health Laboratories and in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Beem at the University of Chicago. In a career change after some years of full-time parenting Bell began teaching pre-school children and then with an MST degree from the University of Chicago became a primary school teacher.

    In the early 1980's Bell did interview-based research on the mathematics capabilities of young children that showed very clearly that these capabilities had been seriously underestimated. This led her to work with other founding authors within the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) on development of the grades K-6 Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    On completion of the First Edition of Everyday Mathematics she returned to her science roots, founding with others the Chicago Science Group to develop the K-5 Science Companion curriculum. That curriculum, distributed by Pearson Scott Foresman, seeks to be inquiry based, relatively easy to implement, firmly rooted in "reform" oriented national standards, and easily integrated with such programs as Everyday Mathematics.

  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics, and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • David W. Beer

    David Beer joined The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) as ethnographic evaluator in 2003. His work at the center has included: providing strategic consulting support to the New York City Department of Education as it implements Everyday Mathematics; developing a survey group that has conducted numerous studies of mathematics teaching, learning, professional development, and curriculum use in the U.S., in Chicago, and in New York City; developing a video library of Everyday Mathematics lessons in urban classrooms; co-leading the Early Childhood team revising and authoring the 3rd Edition of Everyday Mathematics for Kindergarten, and directing the field test of the 3rd Edition of Everyday Mathematics for Pre-Kindergarten.

    Prior to joining CEMSE, Beer was Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). He taught occupational and physical therapy students, trained graduate students in qualitative research, and evaluated human service, early childhood, and elementary school interventions. He also published articles and chapters on evaluation, the experience of illness and disability, and qualitative research methods.

    From 1984 until 1991, Beer was research associate at the Erikson Institute, where he taught, conducted various evaluation research projects concerning pre-primary and primary school education and human service delivery, and helped author What Children Can Tell Us (Garbarino et al, 1987). Beer was trained as a cultural anthropologist at the University of Chicago.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

Grade 1

Authors
Jean Bell, Max Bell, John Bretzlauf, Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, James McBride, Rachel Malpass McCall, Kathleen Pitvorec, Peter Saecker
First Edition only
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Jeanine O'Nan Brownell, Andrea Cocke, Brooke A. North
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Rossita Fernando, Lila K. Schwartz
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Allison Greer, Meg Schleppenbach, Cynthia Annorh, Amy DeLong, Debra Fields, Jenny Fischer, Nancy Glinka, Serena Hohmann, Robert Balfanz, Judith Busse, Mary Ellen Dairyko, Lynn Evans, James Flanders, Dorothy Freedman, Nancy Guile Goodsell, Pam Guastafeste, Nancy Hanvey, Murray Hozinsky, Deborah Arron Leslie, Sue Lindsley, Mariana Mardrus, Carol Montag, Elizabeth Moore, Kate Morrison, William D. Pattison, Joan Pederson, Erenda Penix, June Ploen, Herb Price, Danette Riehle, Ellen Ryan, Marie Schilling, Shelia Sconiers, Susan Sherrill, Patricia Smith, Kimberli Sorg, Robert Strang, Jaronda Strong, Kevin Sweeney, Sally Vongsathorn, Esther Weiss, Francine Williams, Michael J. Wilson, Izaak Wirzup
  • Jean Bell

    Jean Bell is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and the Center Agreement that established the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago.

    Early in her career Jean Bell was a microbiologist in the California State Public Health Laboratories and in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Beem at the University of Chicago. In a career change after some years of full-time parenting Bell began teaching pre-school children and then with an MST degree from the University of Chicago became a primary school teacher.

    In the early 1980's Bell did interview-based research on the mathematics capabilities of young children that showed very clearly that these capabilities had been seriously underestimated. This led her to work with other founding authors within the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) on development of the grades K-6 Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    On completion of the First Edition of Everyday Mathematics she returned to her science roots, founding with others the Chicago Science Group to develop the K-5 Science Companion curriculum. That curriculum, distributed by Pearson Scott Foresman, seeks to be inquiry based, relatively easy to implement, firmly rooted in "reform" oriented national standards, and easily integrated with such programs as Everyday Mathematics.

  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Rachel Malpass McCall

    Rachel Malpass McCall has been with the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and K-12 Science Education (CEMSE) for over four years. She is the lead author for the Grade 1 teacher and student materials for the Third Edition of Everyday Mathematics. Most recently, Ms. McCall has been focusing her efforts on updates to the third edition of Everyday Mathematics, including the state editions and the forthcoming copyright update, and planning for future editions of Everyday Mathematics.

    Before coming to the University of Chicago, Ms. McCall worked for three years as an editor for Pearson Education. She spent two years in the mathematics department as the primary editor for the 2004 edition of Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics for First Grade. During that time McCall also collaborated with the team at TERC in updating Investigations in Number, Data, and Space. In her last year with the publisher, Ms. McCall participated in the planning and initial writing of the 2006 edition of Scott Foresman Science for Grades 1 and 2.

    McCall spent 7 years teaching elementary school in Nashville, Tennessee; Atlanta, Georgia; and Berwyn, Illinois prior to her time at Pearson Education. McCall holds an Early Childhood teaching certificate, undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Early Childhood Education, and a Masters degree in Reading and Learning Disabilities.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Mary Ellen Dairyko

    Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development

    Ellen Dairyko is a senior curriculum developer and Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She is one of the authors of the third edition, and the Common Core State Standards edition of Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics. Additionally, she co-authored the Everyday Mathematics My Reference Book. She has developed and implemented professional development training for teachers, teacher leaders, and administrators in Chicago and elsewhere. Dairyko taught in Kindergarten through eighth grade special education settings and in early childhood general education settings in Chicago public schools. She holds a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from National-Louis University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Mundelein College.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

Grade 2

Authors
Max Bell, Jean Bell, John Bretzlauf, Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, James McBride, Cheryl G. Moran, Kathleen Pitvorec, Peter Saecker
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Kathleen Clark, Patti Satz
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
John Wray, Don Reneau
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Mikhail Guzowski, Catherine Ann Gesell, Serena Hohmann, Lisa Christine Munson, Kathleen Marie Pina, Gabriel Sheridan, Librada Acosta, Carol Arkin, Robert Balfanz, Sharlean Brooks, Jean Callahan, Anne Coglianese, Mary Ellen Dairyko, Tresea Felder, Dorothy Freedman, Rita Gronbach, Deborah Arron Leslie, William D. Pattison, LaDonna Pitts, Danette Riehle, Marie Schilling, Sheila Sconiers, Kathleen Snook, Robert Strang, Sadako Tengan, Therese Wasik, Leeann Wille, Michael Wilson
  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Jean Bell

    Jean Bell is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and the Center Agreement that established the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago.

    Early in her career Jean Bell was a microbiologist in the California State Public Health Laboratories and in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Beem at the University of Chicago. In a career change after some years of full-time parenting Bell began teaching pre-school children and then with an MST degree from the University of Chicago became a primary school teacher.

    In the early 1980's Bell did interview-based research on the mathematics capabilities of young children that showed very clearly that these capabilities had been seriously underestimated. This led her to work with other founding authors within the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) on development of the grades K-6 Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    On completion of the First Edition of Everyday Mathematics she returned to her science roots, founding with others the Chicago Science Group to develop the K-5 Science Companion curriculum. That curriculum, distributed by Pearson Scott Foresman, seeks to be inquiry based, relatively easy to implement, firmly rooted in "reform" oriented national standards, and easily integrated with such programs as Everyday Mathematics.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Cheryl Moran

    As the Associate Director for Direct Services, Cheryl Moran has developed and implemented workshops for in-service teachers, teacher leaders, and administrators at both the local and national levels. She currently is writing after-school materials aligned to the Everyday Mathematics curriculum, coordinating in-school support for the Chicago Public Schools Restructuring Schools Support Project and supporting mathematics instruction at a Chicago Public School.

    Ms. Moran is one of the third edition authors for Everyday Mathematics, grade 2 and Everyday Mathematics My Reference Book. She has a Bachelors degree in psychology and a Masters degree in Teaching. She began her career with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Mary Ellen Dairyko

    Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development

    Ellen Dairyko is a senior curriculum developer and Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She is one of the authors of the third edition, and the Common Core State Standards edition of Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics. Additionally, she co-authored the Everyday Mathematics My Reference Book. She has developed and implemented professional development training for teachers, teacher leaders, and administrators in Chicago and elsewhere. Dairyko taught in Kindergarten through eighth grade special education settings and in early childhood general education settings in Chicago public schools. She holds a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from National-Louis University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Mundelein College.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

Grade 3

Authors
Max Bell, Jean Bell, John Bretzlauf, Mary Ellen Dairyko, Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, James McBride, Kathleen Pitvorec, Peter Saecker
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Lisa Bernstein, Carole Skalinder
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Jamie Montague Callister, Don Reneau
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Carol Arkin, Robert Balfanz, Sharlean Brooks, Mary Dominguez, David Garcia, Rita Gronbach, Mikhail Guzowski, Serena Hohmann, Carla LaRochelle, Deborah Arron Leslie, Curtis Lieneck, Diana Marino, William D. Pattison, William Salvato, Rebecca A. Schneider, Sheila Sconiers, Sandra Siebert, Kathleen Snook, David B. Spangler, Jean Marie Sweigart, Carolyn Wais, Leeann Wille
  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Jean Bell

    Jean Bell is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and the Center Agreement that established the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago.

    Early in her career Jean Bell was a microbiologist in the California State Public Health Laboratories and in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Beem at the University of Chicago. In a career change after some years of full-time parenting Bell began teaching pre-school children and then with an MST degree from the University of Chicago became a primary school teacher.

    In the early 1980's Bell did interview-based research on the mathematics capabilities of young children that showed very clearly that these capabilities had been seriously underestimated. This led her to work with other founding authors within the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) on development of the grades K-6 Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    On completion of the First Edition of Everyday Mathematics she returned to her science roots, founding with others the Chicago Science Group to develop the K-5 Science Companion curriculum. That curriculum, distributed by Pearson Scott Foresman, seeks to be inquiry based, relatively easy to implement, firmly rooted in "reform" oriented national standards, and easily integrated with such programs as Everyday Mathematics.

  • Mary Ellen Dairyko

    Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development

    Ellen Dairyko is a senior curriculum developer and Associate Director, Everyday Mathematics Development at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She is one of the authors of the third edition, and the Common Core State Standards edition of Grade 3 Everyday Mathematics. Additionally, she co-authored the Everyday Mathematics My Reference Book. She has developed and implemented professional development training for teachers, teacher leaders, and administrators in Chicago and elsewhere. Dairyko taught in Kindergarten through eighth grade special education settings and in early childhood general education settings in Chicago public schools. She holds a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from National-Louis University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Mundelein College.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

Grade 4

Authors
Max Bell, John Bretzlauf, Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, Rebecca W. Maxcy, James McBride, Kathleen Pitvorec, Peter Saecker, Robert Balfanz*, William Carroll*, Sheila Sconiers*
* First Edition only
Common Core State Standards Edition only
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Carla L. La Rochelle, Rebecca W. Maxcy
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Laurie K. Thrasher, Kathryn M. Rich
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Carla LaRochelle, Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, David B. Spangler, Deborah Karen Cohen, Maureen Dando, Joseph Dunlap, Serena Hohmann, Joanna Jolly, Carrie Kamm, Colleen Kelly, Sarah Elizabeth Martinek, Claire Doremus Ruch, Laurel Serleth, Nancy Smith, Cynthia G. Somerville, Ingrid Stressenger, Martha Ayala, Virginia J. Bates, Randee Blair, Donna R. Clay, Vanessa Day, Jean Faszholz, Patti Haney, Margaret Phillips Holm, Nancy Kay Hubert, Sybil Johnson, Judith Kiehm, Deborah Arron Leslie, Laura Ann Luczak, Mary O'Boyle, William D. Pattison, Beverly Pilchman, Denise Porter, Judith Ann Robb, Mary Seymour, Laura A. Sunseri-Driscoll
  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Rebecca Williams Maxcy

    Senior Curriculum Developer

    Rebecca W. Maxcy is a senior curriculum developer at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary and Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She is one of the authors of the CCSS edition of Grade 4 Mathematics Everyday. She worked as a teacher in residence on the Grade 4 Everyday Mathematics third edition and on various state specific editions. Currently, Maxcy is planning future development of Everyday Mathematics. She taught elementary school in Chicago public schools, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, and Poland Springs, Maine. Maxcy trained resident teachers at the Chicago Academy, in addition to being adjunct faculty at National Louis University. Maxcy earned a master’s in elementary education from Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a bachelor of arts degree from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.

  • Rebecca Williams Maxcy

    Senior Curriculum Developer

    Rebecca W. Maxcy is a senior curriculum developer at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary and Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She is one of the authors of the CCSS edition of Grade 4 Mathematics Everyday. She worked as a teacher in residence on the Grade 4 Everyday Mathematics third edition and on various state specific editions. Currently, Maxcy is planning future development of Everyday Mathematics. She taught elementary school in Chicago public schools, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, and Poland Springs, Maine. Maxcy trained resident teachers at the Chicago Academy, in addition to being adjunct faculty at National Louis University. Maxcy earned a master’s in elementary education from Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a bachelor of arts degree from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

  • Denise Porter

    In 1984, Denise A. Porter received a Bachelors of Science degree in Elementary Education from Iowa State University in Ames, IA. She taught elementary school for nine years, with five of the years as a Mathematics Specialist. In 1990, Ms. Porter earned a Masters of Education degree from the University of Houston.

    Ms. Porter worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1993-1996 and 2003 to present. She was involved in the development of the first editions of Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics and the third edition of Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics, along with serving as author for various state editions.

    Since 1993, Ms. Porter has provided professional development to administrators, teachers, and parents in a wide variety of school districts, regarding the implementation of Everyday Mathematics. She currently is with the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and K-12 Science Education (CEMSE) as an Associate in Direct Services. She supports staff at restructured Chicago Public Schools with mathematics instruction and develops and facilitates professional development.

Grade 5

Authors
Max Bell, John Bretzlauf, Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, James McBride, Kathleen Pitvorec, Denise Porter, Peter Saecker, Noreen Winningham*, Robert Balfanz, William Carroll
First Edition only
* Third Edition only
Common Core State Standards Edition only
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Fran Goldenberg, Sandra Vitantonio
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Rosina Busse, Laurie K. Thrasher, David B. Spangler
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Sandra R. Overcash, Serena Hohmann, Sally S. Johnson, Colleen M. Kelly, Kimberley Dawn Sowa, Tracy Lynn Selock, Tammy Belgrade, Diana Carry, Debra Dawson, Kevin Dorken, Laurel Hallman, Ann Hemwell, Elizabeth Homewood, Linda Klaric, Lee Kornhauser, Judy Korshak-Samuels, Deborah Arron Leslie, Joseph C. Liptak, Sharon McHugh, Janet M. Meyers, Susan Mieli, Donna Nowatzki, Sheila Sconiers, Kevin J. Smith, Theresa Sparlin, Laura Sunseri, Kim Van Haitsma, John Wilson, Mary Wilson, Carl Zmola, Theresa Zmola
  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Noreen Winningham

    Noreen Winningham is on loan to the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and K-12 Science Education (CEMSE) from School District 65 (Evanston , Illinois). At the U of C, Ms. Winningham is the main author for the 5th grade teacher and student materials for the third edition of Everyday Mathematics. She is a member of the author team for the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) secondary component PreTransitions textbook, and is a member of the In-School Support Team for several CEMSE and Chicago Public Schools projects.

    Before coming to the University of Chicago, Ms. Winningham was an elementary/middle school teacher and administrator for eighteen years and a private consultant to elementary school districts in 25 U.S. states, France, and Belgium for the prior ten years. Winningham's past work includes the design and management of programming for the integration of the arts into the basic curriculum and the design and delivery of teacher professional development in mathematics and computer technology.

    Ms. Winningham has authored a number of pamphlets and texts, including Reading Olympics, published by Prurock Press. She also has been part of numerous research projects focusing on developing mathematics curriculum for elementary school. Ms. Winningham holds K-9 teaching, general administration, and superintendent certificates, an undergraduate degree in communication/computer science, a masters degree in elementary instruction, and a doctorate in educational leadership.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

  • Denise Porter

    In 1984, Denise A. Porter received a Bachelors of Science degree in Elementary Education from Iowa State University in Ames, IA. She taught elementary school for nine years, with five of the years as a Mathematics Specialist. In 1990, Ms. Porter earned a Masters of Education degree from the University of Houston.

    Ms. Porter worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1993-1996 and 2003 to present. She was involved in the development of the first editions of Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics and the third edition of Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics, along with serving as author for various state editions.

    Since 1993, Ms. Porter has provided professional development to administrators, teachers, and parents in a wide variety of school districts, regarding the implementation of Everyday Mathematics. She currently is with the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and K-12 Science Education (CEMSE) as an Associate in Direct Services. She supports staff at restructured Chicago Public Schools with mathematics instruction and develops and facilitates professional development.

Grade 6

Authors
Max Bell, John Bretzlauf, Sarah R. Burns Amy Dillard, Robert Hartfield, Andy Isaacs, James McBride, Ann McCarty*, Kathleen Pitvorec, Peter Saecker, Robert Balfanz, William Carroll
First Edition only
* Third Edition only
Common Core State Standards Edition only
Technical Art
Diana Barrie
Teachers in Residence
Denise Porter
Mathematics and Technology Advisor
James Flanders
UCSMP Editorial
Kathryn M. Rich, Laurie K. Thrasher
3rd Edition ELL Consultant
Kathryn Chval
Teacher-in-Residence for the Assessment Handbook
Soundarya Radhakrishnan
Assistant for the Differentiation Handbook
Serena Hohmann
Contributors
Regina Littleton, Kriszta Miner, Kelley E. Buchheister, Aaron T. Hill, Mollie Rudnick, Serena Hohmann, Barbara J. Kitz, Moira S. Rodgers, Linda Werner, Ann Brown, Sarah Busse, Terry DeJohng, Craig Dezell, John Dini, Donna Goffron, Steve Heckley, Karen Hedberg, Deborah Arron Leslie, Sharon McHugh, Janet M. Meyers, Donna Owen, William D. Pattison, Marilyn Pavlak, Jane Picken, Kelly Porto, John Sabol, Sheila Sconiers, Rose Ann Simpson, Debbi Suhajda, Laura Sunseri, Andrea Tyrance, Kim Van Haitsma, Mary Wilson, Nancy Wilson, Jackie Winston, Carl Zmola, Theresa Zmola
  • Max Bell

    Max Bell is Professor Emeritus, Department of Education and the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and is affiliated with the University of Chicago Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). He is one of the founding authors of Everyday Mathematics (EM), and part of the Author panel that has responsibility for general oversight of the Publishing Agreement for Everyday Mathematics and of the Center Agreement that established CEMSE.

    Bell shifted in 1960 from teaching high school students to teaching teachers in the then-new MAT program at the University of Chicago. (He had earlier been in an influential NSF funded Academic Year Institute for mathematics teachers conducted by the UC mathematics department.) He spent a decade as MAT Mathematics Coordinator while also working with UC people, SMSG, and other organizations on reform-oriented secondary school mathematics materials. But as it became very clear that many children (and nearly all Chicago inner city children) entered secondary school with little understanding of mathematics, Bell shifted his attention to elementary school mathematics instruction and teacher preparation.

    Bell's widely reprinted 1973 article ("What does 'everyman' really need from school mathematics?") set an ambitious content agenda that anticipated the 1989 NCTM "Standards." Structured interviews of several hundred five to nine year old children clearly showed that their mathematics learning capabilities were much greater than had been supposed. At the same time, textbook analyses and interviews with teachers revealed an essentially vacuous primary school mathematics curriculum. With those foundations established by 1985, Bell joined with others in the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in research, development, field testing, and widespread dissemination of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum for grades K-6.

    Bell continues his interest in improvement of elementary school science and mathematics teaching, now focused on maximizing the potential for "educative curricula" (from which teachers learn as they teach) to attack well known problems of scale in helping in-service teachers better understand and teach science and mathematics. Also, Bell and CEMSE colleagues are just beginning conceptualization and specifications for a coherent "web based curriculum" for any individual who for any reason wishes to learn mathematics, from basic counting and arithmetic through data analysis, algebra, or geometry.

  • Sarah Burns

    Senior Curriculum Developer

    Sarah Burns came to CEMSE from Connecticut, where she taught in the Farmington Public School system. She began by working as part of a program funded by the Illinois Board of Higher Education that provided support to teachers using Everyday Mathematics in Chicago Public Schools. Sarah was the sixth grade team leader for the Common Core State Standards edition of Everyday Mathematics and is currently serving as the Grade 5 Everyday Mathematics team leader. Sarah holds a bachelor’s degree in English and a master of science degree in elementary education, both from the University of Pennsylvania.

  • Amy Dillard

    Amy L. Dillard received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education from Boston College in Chestnut Hill, MA. She taught elementary school for four years at Hoffman School in Glenview, Illinois. In 1994, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics Education from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

    Ms. Dillard worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1994 to 1997. She was involved in the development of the commercial publication of the first edition of Fourth Grade Everyday Mathematics, as well as the field testing and commercial publication of the first editions of Fifth Grade Everyday Mathematics and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics. Ms. Dillard worked from 1997 to 2001 as one of the authors of the second editions of Everyday Mathematics K-6.

    In 2002 she began work for the UCSMP Everyday Mathematics Center. The NSF-funded center was established to support educators, parents and students who are using, or will soon be using, Everyday Mathematics. Since 2003 and currently, Ms. Dillard serves as the Associate Director of Everyday Mathematics, third edition.

  • Andrew Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs received a BA in classical Greek from Northwestern University in 1974, an MST in elementary education from the University of Chicago in 1977, an MS in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 1987, and a DA in mathematics (with concentrations in abstract algebra and theoretical computer science) from UIC in 1994. Philip Wagreich directed Isaacs's dissertation, "Whole number concepts and operations in grades 1 and 2: Curriculum and rationale."

    From 1977 to 1985, Isaacs taught fourth and fifth grades in Chicago-area public schools. In 1985, he joined the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at UIC as a lecturer in mathematics education. Beginning in 1986, Isaacs worked closely with Wagreich and Howard Goldberg on the NSF-funded Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Science Project (TIMS). In 1989 and 1990, he worked with Wagreich and David Page on UIC's Maneuvers with Mathematics Project, another NSF-funded curriculum development effort. From 1990 to 1995, he was a full time writer for Math Trailblazers, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5 based on TIMS and funded by NSF.

    In 1995, Isaacs joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to work on the Bridges to Classroom Mathematics Project, which was directed by Sheila Sconiers. Isaacs was an author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, published in 2000 and 2001, and most recently, he directed revisions that led to a third edition of Everyday Mathematics in 2007. He is Co-Director of the University's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, and a Senior Research Associate in the University's Physical Sciences Division.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is a Senior Research Associate in the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he is Co-Director of the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Within CEMSE, McBride is director of sampling and statistical analysis for all survey research, including implementation studies, teacher surveys, and studies of student achievement. And for the past fourteen years, he has been a principal author for all three editions of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) program.

    From 1980 to 1992, McBride was Senior Research Director and Senior Mathematical Statistician at Response Analysis Corporation. His work focused on the areas of sample design, estimation procedures, modeling, imputation, and statistical analysis. Assignments covered the gamut of survey research applications for both complex national surveys and smaller, special population surveys. He is experienced in directing the data collection and budget monitoring activities associated with national population surveys.

    From 1975 to 1980, McBride was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. He directed the undergraduate program in statistics, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses in inference, probability, multivariate analysis, experimental design, demography, time series, econometrics, statistical computing and simulation, and exploratory data analysis. He taught courses at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and the University of Chicago, and has been a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. He holds a grades 6-12 teaching certificate and a B.S. in mathematics and physics, an MAT in mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics, all from the University of Chicago.

  • Ann McCarty

    Ann McCarty was the lead author for the Grade 6 teacher and student materials for the Third Edition of Everyday Mathematics. Ann has also written and evaluated mathematics and science teacher and student materials for Pearson Education, Harcourt Education, and ETA/Cuisenaire.

    Prior to working in publishing, McCarty worked as a curriculum coordinator, supervising the implementation and instructional delivery of the Second Edition of Everyday Mathematics (K-5), as well as middle school content 6-8. Ann also served as a consultant to National Board Certification (NBC) candidates and district-level science coordinators who were conducting mathematics curriculum analysis projects using TIMSS data.

    McCarty began her teaching career in Western Samoa where she served as a Peace Corps Volunteer, teaching mathematics at Aleipata High School. She was a finalist for the Excellence in Elementary Mathematics Teaching Award in 1994. Ann holds a Type 09 Illinois teaching certificate, undergraduate degrees in Clinical Psychology and Mathematics, as well as a master's degree in Science Education.

  • Kathleen Pitvorec

    Kathleen Pitvorec received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1987 and an M.S.T. in 2001 from the University of Chicago. Ms. Pitvorec began her career in education with eight years as an elementary school teacher in both public and private schools. She left the classroom to become part of the author team of Everyday Mathematics, joining the team in late 1995 as a Teacher-in-Residence, and becoming one of the authors for second and third editions.

    In addition to participating in the writing of the materials, as one of the second-edition authors, she coordinated the preliminary information-gathering from teachers about first-edition materials and the field test of the revised materials. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Pitvorec served as the Associate Director of the Implementation Center at the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP). In this position, she developed and implemented workshops for inservice teachers, teacher-leaders, and administrators at local and national levels.

    From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Pitvorec was a third edition author of Everyday Mathematics. She oversaw the development, field testing, and revision of open-response assessment items for Grades 1-6. She is a co-author on the grade-level specific third edition Differentiation Handbooks and Assessment Handbooks included with the program materials.

    In 2006 and 2007, Ms. Pitvorec worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois investigating teachers' implementations of elementary school standards-based mathematics lessons. In 2008, she worked on an NSF-funded research project at the University of Illinois researching assessment tools in Everyday Mathematics. She is currently a doctoral student in the Learning Sciences program at the University of Illinois doing her dissertation research on the training of preservice elementary school mathematics teachers.

  • Peter Saecker

    Peter Saecker received a B.A. in Mathematics from Lawrence University in 1959 and an M.A. in Mathematics as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from UCLA in 1960. After a year of graduate study in mathematics at Northwestern in 1961, Peter Saecker joined Science Research Associates as a mathematics editor. For the next 31 years, he wrote, edited, and managed a variety of educational materials at SRA, including elementary and secondary math textbooks and software.

    In the early 1990s he helped write the grant proposal that secured NSF funding for the development of Everyday Mathematics Grades 4-6. Saecker joined the team full time in 1992 and continued to work on Everyday Mathematics through the completion of the second edition in 2001. He died in the summer of 2001, as the second edition was going into print.

  • Diana Barrie

    Diana Barrie received her BFA and MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She taught photography and film-making at the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

    After working in the reprographics industry in New York City and Chicago, she came to UCSMP in 1990, where she has performed various duties, including creating technical illustrations for all grade levels of Everyday Mathematics. She has also created illustrations for Science Companion and the Center for Urban School Improvement's STEP Literacy Assessments.

  • Denise Porter

    In 1984, Denise A. Porter received a Bachelors of Science degree in Elementary Education from Iowa State University in Ames, IA. She taught elementary school for nine years, with five of the years as a Mathematics Specialist. In 1990, Ms. Porter earned a Masters of Education degree from the University of Houston.

    Ms. Porter worked as a Teacher-in-Residence with the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) from 1993-1996 and 2003 to present. She was involved in the development of the first editions of Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics and the third edition of Sixth Grade Everyday Mathematics, along with serving as author for various state editions.

    Since 1993, Ms. Porter has provided professional development to administrators, teachers, and parents in a wide variety of school districts, regarding the implementation of Everyday Mathematics. She currently is with the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and K-12 Science Education (CEMSE) as an Associate in Direct Services. She supports staff at restructured Chicago Public Schools with mathematics instruction and develops and facilitates professional development.

  • Kathryn B. Chval

    Kathryn B. Chval is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Missouri Center for Mathematics and Science Teacher Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Chval is also a Co-Principal Investigator for the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum and the Researching Science and Mathematics Teacher Learning in Alternative Certification Models Project which are both funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Prior to joining University of Missouri, Dr. Chval was the Acting Section Head for the Teacher Professional Continuum Program in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Division at the National Science Foundation. She also spent fourteen years at the University of Illinois at Chicago managing NSF-funded projects.

    Dr. Chval's research interests include (1) effective preparation models and support structures for teachers across the professional continuum, (2) effective elementary teaching of underserved populations, especially English language learners, and (3) curriculum standards and policies.

  • Soundarya Radhakrishnan

    Soundarya Radhakrishnan has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. She received her graduate degree in education from Northwestern University in 2001. Ms. Radhakrishnan was a Chicago Public School teacher at Gray Elementary from 2001-2003. She worked as a Math Specialist with the Chicago Public School system advising elementary math teachers of five Area 1 schools in 2003-2004. Her responsibilities included providing professional development and teacher training through workshops as well as co-teaching and modeling lessons in K-6 classrooms using Everyday Mathematics curriculum.

    In 2004-2005, she was part of developing the Everyday Mathematics open response assessment section of the third edition of the Assessment Handbook at the University of Chicago. This included creating and developing open response problems for grades 1-6, field-testing these problems in classrooms at two Chicago schools, and developing rubrics for analyzing student work.

    From 2005-2008, she worked as an education consultant for the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that involved training teachers both in public and private Schools. She is currently working as a Math Facilitator in the Office of Math and Science for the Chicago Public Schools.

  • Serena Hohmann

    Serena Hohmann received a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from University of Chicago in 2006. Throughout her undergraduate and graduate studies, Ms. Hohmann studied and worked in both Spain and Mexico.

    From 2005 to 2006, she served as an editorial assistant for the third edition's language diversity team, focusing primarily on the Everyday Mathematics Differentiation Handbooks. In this position, she observed bilingual classrooms, conducted extensive research on language acquisition, and consulted with several bilingual educators and specialists to determine how to best adapt the curriculum for English Language Learners.

    After completing her graduate work in 2006, Ms. Hohmann was selected for a Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) at the U.S. Department of State, Office for Analysis of Inter-American Affairs. She currently serves as a Foreign Affairs Analyst, providing policy-makers in-depth analyses of Mexico and Canada.

  • Jim Flanders

    Jim Flanders is a researcher at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago where his focus is on integrating technology into the mathematics curriculum. He is a contributing author of several University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) books including Everyday Mathematics, Transition Mathematics, Algebra, Advanced Algebra, and Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry.

    Prior to joining CEMSE he was a member of the Chicago Science Group helping develop the field testing of the Science Companion and evaluating software for elementary school mathematics. He also wrote calculator software for the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and was a consultant to the Everyday Learning Corporation and the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Project.

    Flanders has been an assistant professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at Western Michigan University where he had NSF support to develop a course for preservice mathematics teachers on integrating technology into secondary school mathematics. He has also been an instructor of mathematics at the Colorado College and an academic dean and mathematics department chair at The Colorado Springs School. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Chicago.

  • Deborah Arron Leslie

    Debbie Leslie is a senior curriculum developer, early childhood specialist, and Director of Science Companion Projects at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). She provides professional development, coaching, and consultation to support the implementation of Everyday Mathematics and inquiry-based science curricula in the University of Chicago charter schools, the Chicago Public Schools, and elsewhere.

    Ms. Leslie is also the Early Childhood Team Leader for the elementary component of UCSMP. In this capacity, she led the author team that developed the new version of Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and the team that worked on the 3rd edition revisions for Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics. Leslie is also one of the authors of Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum.

    At CEMSE, Leslie works on several projects that draw on her background in science and her interest in high-quality professional development in the areas of math, science, and early childhood education. Leslie taught Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade for 10 years in Connecticut and in the Chicago area. She has also done work for the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University, the Field Museum, and the Rochelle Lee Fund in Chicago, Illinois, and has done presentations, consulting, and professional development for several other educational organizations. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Teaching from the University of Chicago.

Related Links

Teaching Everyday Mathematics

Access guides to assessment, computation, differentiation, pacing, and other aspects of Everyday Mathematics instruction.

Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community

Join the Virtual Learning Community to access EM lesson videos from real classrooms, share EM resources, discuss EM topics with other educators, and more.

Professional Development

The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education offers strategic planning services for schools that want to strengthen their Pre-K–6 mathematics programs.

On the Publisher's Site

McGraw-Hill Education's website features supplemental materials, games, assessment and planning tools, technical support, and more.

About the Authors

Find out more information about the creators of Everyday Mathematics.